Tag Archives | discal herniation
Medical Conditions & Symptoms : Early Parkinson's Disease Symptoms and Posturology

Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms Significantly Reduced Using Posturology

Medical Conditions & Symptoms : Early Parkinson's Disease Symptoms and Posturology

Medical Conditions & Symptoms : Early Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms and Posturology

Posturology is a practice that is relatively new in North America. It has been practiced in France for many years. The basis of the practice is that our eyes, feet, jaw, and skin all play a role in the positioning of the body. Any imbalances can cause pain, muscular stiffness, and decreased movement efficiency. By correcting these imbalances, the pain that results can be eliminated.

Diane, who suffers from Parkinson’s disease, came to see me regarding the pain in her feet that has resulted from her condition. After conducting a postural assessment, I determined that there were several postural imbalances that if corrected could lessen or eliminate her pain.

Diane left my office in tears, shocked by the decrease in pain that occurred in just one session. A tearful phone call came the following morning, and a dancing Diane came into my office two days later.
Generally, my patients have sought help from multiple doctors without seeing any results. They have wasted their time and money on techniques and prescriptions that do not seem to help.

I treated Diane using eye exercises, postural insoles, and addressing her pathological scar and was able to decrease her pain by over 50%. I know that posturology is effective in eliminating pain and I know that we can help many people.

Do not let your schooling get in the way of your education!

The Posturepro Team
Changing Lives

 


 

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Oculomotor asymmetry

Posturology and Scoliosis


What are the neurophysiological basis of the current treatments of scoliosis? There is no basis in neurophysiology for the treatments of scoliosis.  The treatment for scoliosis is purely symptomatic and is addressed with the wear of either a tutor, brace or surgery (Harrington rod). Scoliosis, which is an abnormal curvature of the spine, typically curves into a ‘C’-shape or ‘an S’-shape which can be identified by looking at the back. Since your back is curved and you tend to tilt to one side or one of your shoulders could be lower than the other, a common question pops up, “If I have poor sitting posture where I tend to lean on something, will I develop scoliosis?”.

The short answer is no.  Scoliosis does not come from any types of sports involvement, backpacks, sleeping positions, or minor leg length differences.  The most common form of Scoliosis is Idiopathic Scoliosis, which basically means cause unknown.  That means that researchers do not know what causes scoliosis.

For Posturologists, scoliosis is a pathology of the postural system.  The scapular and pelvic girdles are the buffer systems of posture and in many cases of scoliosis it seems that they have stopped playing their buffer roles at the level of the spinal cord.

Here is what we know about scoliosis;

-We do not know at what age it starts

-It is more frequent with females  (9 women for 1 man)

-If it starts before puberty it will always be a significant scoliosis

-If there is a genetic factor, the subject will have more changes of developing scoliosis than others.

-Anyone can have scoliosis

-Scientists have never identified a specific gene for scoliosis.

A recent study done by FOURNIER demonstrated that in 254 cases of scoliosis all had an ocular participation.  I think that it is interesting to note that there is no known cases of scoliosis in children that are born blind (DUBOUSSAIS).

Posturology have allowed us to demonstrated that scoliosis could be separated into two groups; the first group is where the pelvis is excluded from the scoliosis participation and the second group where the pelvis is participating in the scoliosis process.

Shown in the  below picture;

- The iliac crest does not have the same orientation;
- The Shenton lines are asymmetrical;
- And the obturator foramen  do not have an identical form.

Force plates have allowed us to measure the postural peaks of excluded and included pelvis. It is well known and understood in Posturology  that the treatment protocol with patients with scoliosis will be treated differently from the first group to the second.

-In the first case where the pelvis is participating, subjects react better to treatment, should be it through corsets, rehabilitation or techniques of postural reprogramming. With included pelvis, the Deriver de Fourier show an abnormal peak between 0.2 to 0.6.  The more important the peaks, the worse the scoliosis.

Scoliosis with included pelvis

-In the second case where the pelvis is not participating, subjects do not  react well to stretching methods.  On force plates the  Deriver de Fourier show abnormal vestibulo-spinal reflexes and peaks between 0.2 and 2,  which suggests that there probably exists a proprioceptive non-maturity.

Scoliosis with excluded excluded pelvis

When looked at in the frontal plane, subject with excluded pelvis show uneven lateral shifts of the head and thorax. Scoliosis cases with excluded pelvis are the most serious, they have the most evolutive nature in our series and are the most difficult to treat

 

Excluded-pelvis

Some authors such as Duval Beaupere believed that at the end of puberty scoliosis increased and stabilized itself.  We now know that this is untrue.  Scoliosis will continue to evolve between 0.5 to 2 degrees per year, which is the equivalent to 10 degrees over 20 years (0.5%) and 40 degrees (2%).

In term of proprioceptive maturity and scoliosis we have put a hypothesis that permits us to understand why anyone can develop scoliosis, and why subjects with heredity of scoliosis, have more changes of developing it.

-The first hypothesis is; if an asymmetry of ocular motricity (lack of convergence) of one eye exists before the age of 7 ½, there will be a delay in proprioceptive maturity and anyone can develop scoliosis.

-The second hypothesis is; only the subjects who have a heredity in proprioceptive maturity  could develop scoliosis after the age of 7 ½,  if an asymmetry of ocular motricity exists. These two hypotheses explain why it is possible for anyone to develop scoliosis before the age of 16 ½.

 

TREATMENT

1) The first treatment is Postural Recalibration ;

2) A brace should be worn for scoliosis above 35 degrees, if posture is not corrected the brace will not work well with excluded pelvis ;

3) Proprioceptive reeducation (scoliosis with excluded pelvis should NOT be stretched)  ;

4) In the future, if we are able to make the  difference between those two types of scoliosis, we will probably find a gene pathology that induces proprioception problem, with the possibility of doing prevention though Postural Recalibration and proprioceptive reeducation.

CONCLUSION
Posturologists can make valuable diagnosis and offer meaningful treatment of postural dysfunction in patients with Scoliosis. .  Force plates have shown a disappearance of abnormal peaks on the Derivier de Fournier with Postural Recalibration.  As part of a comprehensive approach to managing scoliosis, Posturologists evaluated the foot, eye, skin and bite for sensory and neuromuscular patterns of dysfunction that can be alleviated by non-surgical/non-brace treatments. In both cases of scoliosis (included or excluded) postural recalibration and proprioceptive rehabilitation are advisable.

The Posturepro Team
Changing Lives

 


 

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Posture and Degenerative Disk Disease (DDD)

Posture and Degenerative Disk Disease (DDD)

Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of back pain, and also one of the most misunderstood. Many patients diagnosed with low back pain caused by degenerative disc disease are left wondering exactly what this diagnosis means for them.

Degenerative Disc Disease

In the majority of cases, (DDD) is caused by irregular oblique and torsion constraints of pressure on the intervertebreal discs.

An intervertebral disc has a 
lamellar structure, and is a super shock absorber that permits to 
absorb shock in every direction of space. However it does not perform well when in “torsion”.
So what causes a disk to be in torsion? Postural Imbalance. Researches made on posture since more than one hundred of years ago bring us to consider the postural system as a whole.

In normal orthostatic posture from the side view (sagittal), the scapular and gluteal planes should be aligned. From the front (frontal plane) , the thoracic and pelvic girdle, should be perfectly horizontal. From the top (transverse plane), there should be no rotation of the scapular and pelvic girdle.

Transverse Plane

If any of these landmarks are not respected, there will hyperconstraints of joints, ligaments and muscles of spine and the intervertebreal disk will be under oblique and torsion pressures.

The first stage of Degenerative disk disease (DDD) consists of the protrusion of the nucleus pulpous. At 
that point, the yellow ligament and the membrane and are still 
present. If unaddressed, 
the second stage of Degenerative disk disease (DDD) is a rupture of the membrane causing the disk to protrude; causing disk herniation.

So what now? If we remove the disk, it will take care of the problem between the vertebra and the pinch on the root nerve, so sciatica or whatever issue 
will disappear. However, the surgeon will have removed the last shock absorber of the 
spine (although the disk is degenerated, it still useful as a shock 
absorber).

Over time, the vertebra on top and below will get closer and put
 posterior pressure on the facet joints that will eventually provoke arthrosis, 
inflammation, and epiduritis. The facet joint that are suffering will contract the muscles to 
prevent movement which will lead to tightness and this tightness 
increases the constraint, and these constraints will go to the higher 
and lower level of the spine.

It is difficult to consider subjects that present a postural clinical imbalance as normal subjects, for several reasons:

  • The subjects having a posture clinically well balanced do not suffer from low backpain;
  • The patients who are suffering always present an obvious postural imbalance;
  • When postural system inputs are out of order that brings about postural imbalance, the body never cures itself, on the contrary it integrates the new postural scheme and considers it as normal;

So when we a surgeon operates a discal herniation, (and I am not implying that it should
 never be done), is he treating the symptom or the cause?

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