Tag Archives | postural insoles
Feet

Postural Insoles: What’s the strory?

Foreword

One of the questions that I often get asked is: why doesn’t my doctor know about this? Most health-care practitioners are trained to treat one body part or condition at a time.

Doctors are trained to prescribe medication to hide or treat symptoms, while unfortunately sometimes ignoring the cause of the pain. Ophthamologists are interested in refraction disorders and in binocular vision disorders. Podiatrists are trained to cast the feet with pads that can go up to 2cm of thickness. Dentists work on the teeth and jaws without considering that the head is connected to a body, physical therapists  palpate, stretch, pull on muscles, completely oblivious to the fact that the sensitivity of a muscle is subservient to the information it is receiving from the voluntary (Pyramidal tracts) and involuntary system (Extrapyramidal system) and Chiropractics manipulates bones and subluxations which are influenced by postural asymmetries and constraints, as such, never really addressing primary subluxations.

Neurophysiology has progressed immensely over the last 100 years.  It is time that specialists realize that it is the relationship between the feet, eyes, jaws, inner ear muscle and skin that constitutes the Postural System.  It must be addressed as a whole!

Basic Principle

Humans are in contact with their environment mainly through their feet. The foot provides vertical stability and can adapt to any ascending or descending equilibrium. Once a compensatory pattern has been present for more than a year, the foot and the tissues (fasciae) of the lower extremity have adapted and are now in that compensatory pattern.


If the information coming from the base of support is uneven, it will have a direct impact on posture, muscle tension, motor output and muscle sensitivity resulting in a pathological postural adjustment that cannot be corrected by only working on a segmental level. The idea that these imbalances can be corrected through exercise, manipulation or palpation is misguided.

The Foot

The foot can decompensate posture in three ways; through the skin (by wearing wedges that are greater than 5mm), through the muscles (the sensitivity of the muscle spindles is affected through the mechanoreceptors), and biomechanically.


An articulacy constrain, such as a slight valgus (pronated) of one foot and a varus (supinated) on the other foot, will cause one side of the pelvis to rotate forward relative to the opposite side, affecting the entire kinetic chain.

The Skin

The skin is the largest organ in the body, it is the first thing that comes into contact with the world and with the ground.  The skin, is globally rich in mechanoreceptors and can relay information back to the CNS regarding pain, stretch, and pressure.  This is how you know whether you are walking on ice or on sand or on a rocky surface.


The skin of the foot just so happens to have a larger receptive field compared to the rest of the body.  It is also equipped with extremely precise skin receptors (mechanoreceptors) that are able to code changes in pressure or length variations up to 1/100th of a mm stretch (ruffini endings).



The Muscles

The muscle spindle is a sensory organ that can code changes in length and stretch and that can recognize variation in tension in the order of 3-24 grams of pressure (Messeiner). The tension of a muscle is under the influence of an voluntary and involuntary system. I think that it is interesting to note that the involuntary system is twice as numerous as the voluntary system and is unable to correct itself by itself, as it responds and executes commands of both voluntary and involuntary systems.  Strengthening exercises will help, but cannot remove the adaptation of the fascias, as such the foot will reinject the disequilibrium through ascending chains.

 

A thick pad greater than 5mm like classic orthotics will sensitize the Golgi receptors (threshold 200 grams) and trigger an inverse myotatic reflex.  This is the reason why the arch lift in classic orthotics increases every year and isto be worn for life.

Whereas a pad less than 3 mm (proprioceptive insoles) will trigger a stimulating effect of the synergetic muscles and modify the activity of the postural chains and balance them. This has been demonstrated by several studies: Magnusson-1999, André Deshays-1998, Thoumie- 1996, Diener-1984, W and Ching-1997

Postural Insoles: What’s the story?

The first thing you need to know is that researchers in Europe (Bourdiol, Bricot, Janin, Roll) have demonstrated that the skin of the foot reacts to different frequencies,  meaning that they were able to induce either a reflex and/or movement in an individual simply by stimulating the skin of the foot with a 90 Hertz frequency. This study was published in 1999 and it is from this very study that the postural insoles were born.

 

The postural insoles act on the skin, on the muscle and are bioenergetic. The postural insoles, contrary to classical insoles, do not aim to tilt the osseous bodies, rather, they trigger a stimulating effect of the flexor chains through reflex pathways.

Conclusion

Because the recalibration tools work with the nervous system, the speed at which the changes occur are very quick. We can see changes in alignment, stability and pain reduction up to 90% in the first consultation. Impressive results have also been seen in the case of serious neurological conditions such as strokes, multiple sclerosis, Parkison’s Disease, Cavernous Angioma and Cerebral Palsy.   We believe the body to be one unit. We also believe that treating any one part of the body without looking at the system as a whole would be an ineffective strategy.
For more information please contact us at 877.315.8489
or at education (at) posturepro (dot) net

The Posturepro Team
Changing Lives

 


 

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Medical Conditions & Symptoms : Early Parkinson's Disease Symptoms and Posturology

Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms Significantly Reduced Using Posturology

Medical Conditions & Symptoms : Early Parkinson's Disease Symptoms and Posturology

Medical Conditions & Symptoms : Early Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms and Posturology

Posturology is a practice that is relatively new in North America. It has been practiced in France for many years. The basis of the practice is that our eyes, feet, jaw, and skin all play a role in the positioning of the body. Any imbalances can cause pain, muscular stiffness, and decreased movement efficiency. By correcting these imbalances, the pain that results can be eliminated.

Diane, who suffers from Parkinson’s disease, came to see me regarding the pain in her feet that has resulted from her condition. After conducting a postural assessment, I determined that there were several postural imbalances that if corrected could lessen or eliminate her pain.

Diane left my office in tears, shocked by the decrease in pain that occurred in just one session. A tearful phone call came the following morning, and a dancing Diane came into my office two days later.
Generally, my patients have sought help from multiple doctors without seeing any results. They have wasted their time and money on techniques and prescriptions that do not seem to help.

I treated Diane using eye exercises, postural insoles, and addressing her pathological scar and was able to decrease her pain by over 50%. I know that posturology is effective in eliminating pain and I know that we can help many people.

Do not let your schooling get in the way of your education!

The Posturepro Team
Changing Lives

 


 

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Oculomotor asymmetry

Posturology and Scoliosis


What are the neurophysiological basis of the current treatments of scoliosis? There is no basis in neurophysiology for the treatments of scoliosis.  The treatment for scoliosis is purely symptomatic and is addressed with the wear of either a tutor, brace or surgery (Harrington rod). Scoliosis, which is an abnormal curvature of the spine, typically curves into a ‘C’-shape or ‘an S’-shape which can be identified by looking at the back. Since your back is curved and you tend to tilt to one side or one of your shoulders could be lower than the other, a common question pops up, “If I have poor sitting posture where I tend to lean on something, will I develop scoliosis?”.

The short answer is no.  Scoliosis does not come from any types of sports involvement, backpacks, sleeping positions, or minor leg length differences.  The most common form of Scoliosis is Idiopathic Scoliosis, which basically means cause unknown.  That means that researchers do not know what causes scoliosis.

For Posturologists, scoliosis is a pathology of the postural system.  The scapular and pelvic girdles are the buffer systems of posture and in many cases of scoliosis it seems that they have stopped playing their buffer roles at the level of the spinal cord.

Here is what we know about scoliosis;

-We do not know at what age it starts

-It is more frequent with females  (9 women for 1 man)

-If it starts before puberty it will always be a significant scoliosis

-If there is a genetic factor, the subject will have more changes of developing scoliosis than others.

-Anyone can have scoliosis

-Scientists have never identified a specific gene for scoliosis.

A recent study done by FOURNIER demonstrated that in 254 cases of scoliosis all had an ocular participation.  I think that it is interesting to note that there is no known cases of scoliosis in children that are born blind (DUBOUSSAIS).

Posturology have allowed us to demonstrated that scoliosis could be separated into two groups; the first group is where the pelvis is excluded from the scoliosis participation and the second group where the pelvis is participating in the scoliosis process.

Shown in the  below picture;

- The iliac crest does not have the same orientation;
- The Shenton lines are asymmetrical;
- And the obturator foramen  do not have an identical form.

Force plates have allowed us to measure the postural peaks of excluded and included pelvis. It is well known and understood in Posturology  that the treatment protocol with patients with scoliosis will be treated differently from the first group to the second.

-In the first case where the pelvis is participating, subjects react better to treatment, should be it through corsets, rehabilitation or techniques of postural reprogramming. With included pelvis, the Deriver de Fourier show an abnormal peak between 0.2 to 0.6.  The more important the peaks, the worse the scoliosis.

Scoliosis with included pelvis

-In the second case where the pelvis is not participating, subjects do not  react well to stretching methods.  On force plates the  Deriver de Fourier show abnormal vestibulo-spinal reflexes and peaks between 0.2 and 2,  which suggests that there probably exists a proprioceptive non-maturity.

Scoliosis with excluded excluded pelvis

When looked at in the frontal plane, subject with excluded pelvis show uneven lateral shifts of the head and thorax. Scoliosis cases with excluded pelvis are the most serious, they have the most evolutive nature in our series and are the most difficult to treat

 

Excluded-pelvis

Some authors such as Duval Beaupere believed that at the end of puberty scoliosis increased and stabilized itself.  We now know that this is untrue.  Scoliosis will continue to evolve between 0.5 to 2 degrees per year, which is the equivalent to 10 degrees over 20 years (0.5%) and 40 degrees (2%).

In term of proprioceptive maturity and scoliosis we have put a hypothesis that permits us to understand why anyone can develop scoliosis, and why subjects with heredity of scoliosis, have more changes of developing it.

-The first hypothesis is; if an asymmetry of ocular motricity (lack of convergence) of one eye exists before the age of 7 ½, there will be a delay in proprioceptive maturity and anyone can develop scoliosis.

-The second hypothesis is; only the subjects who have a heredity in proprioceptive maturity  could develop scoliosis after the age of 7 ½,  if an asymmetry of ocular motricity exists. These two hypotheses explain why it is possible for anyone to develop scoliosis before the age of 16 ½.

 

TREATMENT

1) The first treatment is Postural Recalibration ;

2) A brace should be worn for scoliosis above 35 degrees, if posture is not corrected the brace will not work well with excluded pelvis ;

3) Proprioceptive reeducation (scoliosis with excluded pelvis should NOT be stretched)  ;

4) In the future, if we are able to make the  difference between those two types of scoliosis, we will probably find a gene pathology that induces proprioception problem, with the possibility of doing prevention though Postural Recalibration and proprioceptive reeducation.

CONCLUSION
Posturologists can make valuable diagnosis and offer meaningful treatment of postural dysfunction in patients with Scoliosis. .  Force plates have shown a disappearance of abnormal peaks on the Derivier de Fournier with Postural Recalibration.  As part of a comprehensive approach to managing scoliosis, Posturologists evaluated the foot, eye, skin and bite for sensory and neuromuscular patterns of dysfunction that can be alleviated by non-surgical/non-brace treatments. In both cases of scoliosis (included or excluded) postural recalibration and proprioceptive rehabilitation are advisable.

The Posturepro Team
Changing Lives

 


 

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Body-Alignment

Body Alignment

The practice of posturology focuses on a set of elements in our bodies that together play a role in our alignment. Think about the position of your body and the way that you constantly push against gravity to stand in an upright position. Standing up may seem like a simple movement; however, the decisions to stand up, and stay up, send out signals throughout the body to keep you in a balanced upright position. If one of the areas receiving a message is injured or malfunctioning, the entire alignment of the body can be skewed or misaligned and therefore the basic functioning of the body can become difficult and/or painful.

In order to understand how Posturology works, it is important to understand the basics of how the human body preserves stability. External receptors, such as our eyes, ears, and skin, allow us to locate ourselves within our environment. Together with our internal receptors, the involuntary regulators of our bodies’ homeostasis, our brains send out messages to the muscles that are needed to perform desired actions. If any of our external sensors are malfunctioning or are in misaligned positions, our posture can be affected and pain can become present. Sometimes, the source of our pain is not simple or obvious and once our bodies have adapted to functioning with a disturbance, our entire bodies become pathologically imbalanced. Posturology aims to correct the errors present at the receptors’ sites to return the body to its proper equilibrium.

A “normal” posture is desirable for many reasons. As stated, a disturbance in one’s posture can affect the efficiency of certain parts of the body. “Normal” posture ensures that yours bones are where they are supposed to be and that you aren’t putting excess pressure in any areas. Your posture affects your mood, your sleeping patterns and your basic ability to function. A disturbance in your posture is a disturbance in your quality of life.

Posturology can help with cervical pain, back pain, osteoarthritis, scoliosis, pain in the lower limbs, numbness, migraines and fibromyalgia (to name a few). All of these disorders or symptoms can be directly related to a postural error. Certain postural positions affect the function of our muscles and limbs. Eventually, pain, stiffness, and decreased movement efficiency become present, and depending on the cause, any of the aforementioned disorders or symptoms become present. Without proper treatment, these symptoms or disorders can become chronic.

Posturology is responsible for allowing thousands of individuals to live happy and pain-free. Thankfully, Dentists, osteopaths, chiropractors and sports therapists are among the students that have adopted the Posturology practices are spreading their knowledge to others and popularizing Posturology as a successful method of pain-relief in both Canada and the United States.

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Postural Insoles

Orthodics Vs Postural Insoles

Fallen arches are referred to technically as valgus, and the degree the arches fall is based on a scale of one to three. A rating of three is the most severe and fulfills the classic definition of flat feet. Why is having fallen arches a bad thing? “The first problem is that your base of support is not the same. A valgus foot causes internal rotation of the lower limbs, and this faulty alignment increases the risk of ankle strains, sprains and knee injuries. Also, this rotation increases the risk of lower back injuries because it increases the curvature of the lower back. Excessive lumbar curvature increases muscular tension in the lower back and increases the risk of disc injury because the spine loses much of its shock-absorbing ability – it’s basically bone on bone.

Subtalar joint, flat feet, orthodics, postural insoles

Particularly for gymnasts and figure skaters, their effectiveness is compromised if
foot problems are not addressed first. Treating flat feet consists of two major components:

1. the use of postural insoles and
2. specific strengthening and stretching exercises for the muscles that support the arch.

Flat feet are increasingly common among today’s athletes because of, interestingly enough, higher-quality shoes. “Shoes decrease the sensitivity of the skin on the bottom of the foot, and the nerves in the skin are one of the major sources of postural information to the brain the arch of the foot was not meant to be in constant contact with a surface.

Shoes with insoles that press against the bottom of the arch cause a reflex reaction that causes the arches to collapse even further – in effect, they cause the muscles of the arch to become lazy. The same problem applies to orthotics.”

Postural insoles will cause the arch to reform by stimulating several muscles
of the feet (especially the adductor hallucis, flexor digitorum longus and
brevis) and thereby cause the arch to reform. With many of my clients the insoles can often completely resolve valgus feet so that orthotics may not be necessary at all.

As for weightlifting and weight training exercises such as squats, I recommend that athletes who have valgus feet wear Postural insoles in their weightlifting shoes, if a person with flat feet squats, they often lift their heels up right away because their subtalar and talus joints are internally rotated. Because weightlifting shoes have a 5/8-inch heel lift, they will tend to realign these two joints and as such will allow them to squat deeper.

As for a general guideline about buying shoes, unfortunately you often don’t get what you pay for. Research has shown that the shoes with the most padding have been found to place the most stress on the body, so often the most expensive pairs of shoes
are often the worst shoes for athletes.

The Posturepro Team
Changing Lives

 


 

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